Father's Rights & Paternity Helping Individuals & Families in Tennessee

Advocating For Your Rights As A Father

The child’s relationship with their father can be an important part of their development. Studies have shown that children may do better in school, in social situations and at work if their father was engaged throughout their childhood. That’s why, if you’re going through a divorce or you suspect your spouse may be engaging in parental alienation, it’s important that you advocate for a relationship with your child if you can offer them a stable and healthy environment.

When what matters most is at stake, call Peterson White LLP. Our lawyers are compassionate representatives for fathers seeking to establish legal rights to parent their child. We believe that a person’s relationship with their father is incredibly special, and we want to help you maintain that bond. Building a strong future for your family is our first priority, and we will do what we can to advocate for your rights while keeping your child’s best interests in mind.

How to Establish Paternity

If you and your child’s mother married to each other at the time your child was born, your status as the mother’s husband automatically established your paternity; i.e., legal fatherhood.

As the child’s legal father, your name went on his or her original birth certificate as the father, and you gained not only the right to participate in your child’s life, but also to do the following:

  • Seek custody of or visitation with him or her in the event of your future divorce.
  • Access his or her medical records.
  • Access his or her school records.
  • Add your child to your health insurance plan and your life insurance policy or policies.
  • Grant your son or daughter your Social Security, military and/or veterans benefits upon your death.

Tennessee law also presumes your paternity if you married your child’s mother at the time of his or her conception or any time within 300 days of his or her birth. Furthermore, Tennessee law presumes your paternity if you and your child’s mother divorced at the time of his or her birth, but your divorce became final sometime during the 300 days preceding his or her birth.

Voluntary Paternity Options

If you and your child’s mother never married each other, then you must proactively establish your paternity. The easiest way to do this is for you and the child’s mother to sign a Voluntary Acknowledge of Paternity. This is a legal document that each of you must sign in front of a notary public. If you wish to sign it at the time of your child’s birth, the hospital can provide both the form and the notary.

If you wish to establish paternity later, you can do so at any time before your child’s 21st birthday. But if you wish to establish paternity via the VAoP process, you must do so before your child becomes 19. You can obtain the VAoP form from one of the following agencies:

  • Local Health Department
  • Local Child Support Office
  • Tennessee Office of Vital Records

You will need to provide your Social Security number and a valid state picture I.D., such as your driver’s license. The office will provide the notary and file your VAoP with the proper state authority.

Start The Process Today

We can help you go through the process to legally establish paternity and advocate for your legal parental rights. Give us a call today at (855) 919-4124 to discuss your case. You can also reach us by sending a message online.

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Serving Our Community Since 2011
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